BLACK FRIDAY AT ARTFUZZ?!

27 Nov

At Artfuzz our customers know that it is always Black Friday here, we like to call it Free shipping and wholesale weekdays 365 days a year. If you haven’t figured out that shipping of a framed and canvas item most of time costs half or even more then half as much as the framed or canvas item itself then you’re getting conned by our competitors. Have a Happy Thanksgiving and Successful Shopping.

What is an Art print On Canvas Transfer

18 Jan

Alot of art retailers give you the option of choosing of transfering an art print or poster to canvas but provide you options that are hard to understand if you have never purchased a poster/art print transferred to a ready to hang canvas before. This explains the options in detail and helps you make a wiser decision. Because alot of online retailers will not take a return on a canvas item because they are not easily restockable. Canvas Transfers are created custom per order and just the round trip shipping costs are sometimes as much as the actual product itself. So use the following to make a proper choice or you might get stuck with a Canvas Print that might not be returnable.

Before spending alot of money on a canvas transfer, it is always best to order the poster/print first and see if you really like it and if you really like the colors. The reason why that is because when you browse online art retail sites, you are looking at the image of the actual print. Technology, monitors, and the actual image (gif) though most of the time is exactly like the print but there are chances that it might not be exact, for example a dark green color of the art print might be a bit light green when you receive the print itself. Though this is rare, it does happen so once again before investing in a more expensive Canvas Transfer it is always best to purchase the low priced print first and see if this is what you really want.

Choosing Museum Wrap over Gallery Wrap: you have to be careful here and this is mostly as a preference not one of these will make the product look like an original, face it its a Poster/Art Print where the image is transferred to a Canvas (like an artists canvas) so it is not a real reproduction nor is it an original. A Museum wrap is the uncropped version, imagine a poster with a white border this white border will be stretched over the wood bars of the canvas. If there is no white border, the image itself is stretched to the edge of the canvas not towards the wall keeping the actual size of the poster/print, with the sides being natural canvas color unless its painted as per your request. In gallery wrap the image is stretched over the wood bars and towards the wall thereby making the actual picture look smaller but the sides of the canvas will be the same color as the picture because its the picture stretched towards the wall. an unstretched canvas is just a canvas transfer that is not stretched on bars so it is on canvas material but not ready to hang, cause its not on wood.

3/4 inch or 1 1/2 inch bars what is this? This is the actualy size of the wood bars on the side and up and down of the canvas (the wood frame). To make a proper decision here in what size bars is right for you really depends on how far you want the picture away from the wall when you hang it. Anything over 1 1/4 inch will make the picture kind of look like a box sticking out from the wall more then a picture but there are alot of people who prefer this. The 3/4 inch is the default and will make it look more like an original piece cause its closer to the wall. You can request to make the bars anywhere from 1/2 inch to higher this all depends on how far you want the canvas picture from the wall.

What are Brushstrokes? Brushstrokes are literally that, artists will touch up and enhance the picture sort of like highlight the important parts and colors of the picture. Brushstrokes will not necessarily make your picture look like an better. This is all a matter of preference and taste. I have noticed that on a picture which already has too much light the brushstrokes might make it look to glossy and flashy. So this is once again a matter of preference that should be researched. If brushstrokes are important to you, its important to note that some custom frame shops and retailers might not offer brushstrokes or paint the sides of a museum wrap as requested, if this is the case you can try sources like ArtFuzz.com or Barewalls.

GUIDE TO TELL IF ART PRINTS, CERT, AUTHENTIC OR NOT

23 Dec

IS YOUR CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY WORTH THE PAPER IT’S PRINTED ON?

At ArtFuzz.com, All of our items are from the publisher of the art therefore if the item is SIGNED BY THE ARTIST AS PER THE DESCRIPTION, THEN THE ITEM COMES DELIVERED WITH A CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY, THAT IS NOT FROM A THIRD PARTY OR GALLERY BUT FROM THE PUBLISHER OF THE ART WHO HAD THE EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS TO MAKE THE PRINT WE PURCHASED THE ITEM FROM.

I GIVE CREDIT TO ART BUSINESS FOR WRITING THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE, EVERYONE WHO IS TO SPEND MONEY ON A SIGNED PRINT SHOULD READ THIS ARTICLE.

Question: I bought two limited edition prints from an online art gallery and I expected that the gallery would provide “certificates of authenticity” with the art. In both cases, they shipped the art but not the certificates. The gallery said they would mail the certificates to me, but I have not yet received them. Should collectors get certificates of authenticity when they buy art? Or should the certificates be sent separately after buying the art? Who generates these certificates?

A: To begin with, there is tremendous abuse in the “certificate of authenticity” or COA business, especially at online auctions. Unless a certificate of authenticity originates from and is signed by either the artist, the publisher of the art (in the case of limited editions), a confirmed dealer or agent of the artist (not a third party or reseller), or an acknowledged expert on the artist, it’s pretty much meaningless. A legitimate COA must contain specific details about the art such as when and how it was produced, the names of people or companies involved in it’s production, the art’s exact title, dimensions, and the names of reference books or similar resources that contain either specific or relevant information about the art and/or the artist. It should also state the qualifications of the individual or entity that authored the certificate, and include his or her complete and current contact information.

A formal certificate of authenticity is not necessarily required to prove that a work of art is genuine. Any valid receipt, bill of sale, or proof of purchase from either the artist herself or a confirmed and established dealer or agent of the artist will do. An appraisal from a recognized authority on the artist is also acceptable. To repeat: Only documents from QUALIFIED individuals are acceptable, not those from anyone who appraises art, or from any dealer or agent who buys or sells occasional works by the artist in question.

Certificates of authenticity are often problematic and some can even be worthless. Many people believe that art with a COA is automatically genuine, but that’s not necessarily the case. To begin with, no laws govern who is or is not qualified to write certificates of authenticity, or what types of statements, information or documentation a COA must include. In other words, anyone can write a COA whether they’re qualified or not. As if that’s not bad enough, unscrupulous sellers can and do forge official looking certificates of authenticity and use them to either sell outright fakes or to misrepresent existing works of art as being more important or valuable than they actually are. And to make matters even worse, meaningless COA’s have been issued for decades; a COA dated 1955, for example, can be just as meaningless as one written today.

Your situation is troublesome because the seller apparently told you that the art had certificates of authenticity, but then did not send them with the art. It’s further complicated by the fact that the seller promised to send them, but did not. Best procedure for you is to try to get your money back and shop elsewhere. Keep in mind that if a work of art supposedly comes with a certificate of authenticity, then that certificate should accompany the art when you receive it.

* Any conditional statements found in a certificate of authenticity such as “in our considered opinion…” or “we believe that…” are warning signs that the art may not be genuine. A valid certificate states that the art is unquestionably by the artist who has signed it.

* A valid certificate of authenticity should contain documented proof or evidence as to why the art is genuine.

* If you have any questions about a certificate of authenticity, contact the individual or entity that authored it, assuming that person is not the seller, and ask those questions BEFORE you buy the art.

* When the contact information on a certificate of authenticity is no longer valid or out-of-date, contact a current authority on the artist. Determine whether the old certificate was authored by a legitimate authority and is adequate proof that the art is genuine.

* A statement that a work of art is genuine is NOT valid unless made by a respected authority on the artist. That person’s qualifications should be stated on the certificate.

* A certificate without adequate contact information for the person or company making the statements, or with only an unidentifiable signature should not be considered valid.

* Certificates for art by famous artists such as Picasso, Chagall, and Miro should include the exact titles of the art, names of reference books that list the art, dates the art was produced, names of publishers (for limited editions), edition sizes (for limited editions), and exact dimensions of the art. ALL limited edition prints by Picasso, Chagall, Miro, and many other well-known artists are documented in books called catalogues raisonne. If a catalogue raisonne exists for an artist, the corresponding catalogue number or entry for the work art in question should be noted on the certificate of authenticity.

* Anytime that a certificate of authenticity does not meet all of the above criteria, consider yourself at risk if you buy the art.

What is a Giclee?

23 Dec

WHAT IS A GICLEE?

This more recent then lithography method of making higher quality prints is gaining very high standard popularity.

Why is a Giclee more modern and higher quality then a lithograph?

A giclee (zhee-CLAY) is an individually produced, high-resolution, high-fidelity reproduction done on a special large format printer. Giclees are produced from digital scans of existing artwork. Also, since many artists now produce only digital art, there is no “original” that can be hung on a wall. Giclees solve that problem, while creating a whole new vibrant medium for art.

Giclees can be printed on any number of media, from canvas to watercolor paper to transparent acetates. Giclees are superior to traditional lithography in several ways. The colors are brighter, last longer, and are so high-resolution that they are virtually continuous tone, rather than tiny dots. The range, or “gamut” of color for giclees is far beyond that of lithography, and details are crisper.

Lithography uses tiny dots of four colors–cyan, magenta, yellow and black–to fool the eye into seeing various hues and shades. Colors are “created” by printing different size dots of these four colors.

Giclees use inkjet technology, but far more sophisticated than your desktop printer. The process employs six colors–light cyan, cyan, light magenta, magenta, yellow and black–of lightfast, pigmented inks and finer, more numerous, and replaceable printheads resulting in a wider color gamut, and the ability to use various media to print on. The ink is sprayed onto the page, actually mixing the color on the page to create true shades and hues.

They are priced midway between original art and regular limited edition lithographs. Limited edition litho prints are usually produced in editions of 500-1000 or more, all at once; but giclees rarely exceed 50-100 reproductions, one at a time.

Giclees were originally developed as a proofing system for lithograph printing presses, but it became apparent that the presses were having a hard time delivering the quality and color of the giclee proofs. They evolved into the new darlings of the art world. They are coveted by collectors for their fidelity and quality, and desired by galleries because they don’t have to be produced in huge quantities with their large layout of capital and storage.

In addition, Giclees are produced directly from a digital file, saving generations of detail-robbing negatives and printing plates, as with traditional printing.

See our Giclee Collection

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